Last edited by Fenrilkis
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Childbed fever found in the catalog.

Childbed fever

Childbed fever

a documentary history

  • 347 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Garland Pub. in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Puerperal septicemia -- History -- Sources

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-224).

    Statementedited by Irvine Loudon.
    SeriesGarland reference library of social science ;, vol. 868., Diseases, epidemics, and medicine ;, vol. 2, Garland reference library of social science ;, v. 868., Garland reference library of social science., vol. 2.
    ContributionsLoudon, Irvine.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRG811 .C45 1995
    The Physical Object
    Paginationlxv, 224 p. ;
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1108088M
    ISBN 10081531079X
    LC Control Number94033390

      Ignaz Semmelweis (Figure 1) was the first physician in medical history who demonstrated that puerperal fever (also known as “childbed fever”) was contagious and that its incidence could be drastically reduced by enforcing appropriate hand washing by medical care-givers. Although hugely successful; Semmelweis’ discovery directly.   In he gave up this position to become a professor at Pest University. In he published a book, “The Etiology, Concept, and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever”, but it was badly written and poorly received by the medical establishment. About 5 Cited by:

    Etiology Concept Prophylaxis Childbed Fever. You Searched For: Book is in Used-Good condition. Pages and cover are clean and intact. Used items may not include supplementary materials such as CDs or access codes. May show signs of minor shelf wear and contain limited notes and highlighting.   What Was Then Known. I want to share with you a rather lengthy excerpt from a marvelous book on Semmelweis, The Doctors’ Plague, by the contemporary medical historian Sherwin B. will notice that Dr. Newland summarizes Semmelweis’s background knowledge of the magnitude and details of the childbed fever epidemic by introducing each short paragraph with the .

    In , physician Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote and published "The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever," an essay about puerperal fever, a disease that occurs mainly as a result of bacterial infection in the uterine tract of women after giving birth or undergoing an the essay, Holmes argues that puerperal fever is spread through birth attendants like physicians and midwives who make.   The Carters introduce Childbed Fever, their study of Dr Semmelweis and his times, by quoting from a senior physician of the 19th century who referred to "maternity clinics—birth houses, as they were called—[as] really houses of death." He stated that "the morgue is always full of corpses from the maternity wards, like fish on a slab."Author: T. Keith Edwards.


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Childbed fever Download PDF EPUB FB2

Codell Carter is professor of philosophy at Brigham Young is the author of numerous books, including Childbed Fever, The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease, and A First Course in Logic.

Barbara R. Carter has taught at Cornell University and Brigham Young plays hammered dulcimer with the Salzburg Folk Ensemble Childbed fever book is currently writing a book, Seven Keys to Cited by: The life and work of Ignaz Semmelweis is among the most engaging and moving stories in the history of science.

Childbed Fever makes the Semmelweis story available to a general audience, while placing his life, and his discovery, in the context of his times.

In Vienna, as what would now be called a head resident of obstetrics, Semmelweis confronted the terrible reality of childbed fever. Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth throughout Europe up to the Second World War.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and resulted in miserable and agonizing deaths for thousands of women every year.

This book provides the first detailed account Cited by:   Childbed Fever makes the Semmelweis story available to a general audience, while placing his life, and his discovery, in the context of his times.

In Vienna, as what would now be called a head resident of obstetrics, Semmelweis confronted the terrible reality The life and work of Ignaz Semmelweis is among the most engaging and moving /5. Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever book. Read 4 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

In a Hungarian obstetri /5. Even though this book opens with the chilling tale of Mary Wollstonecraft's death from childbed fever inthe author, a British medical historian and physician, does not focus on Childbed fever book exper. Childbed Fever makes the Semmelweis story available to a general audience, while placing his life, and his discovery, in the context of his times.

In Vienna, as what would now be called a head resident of obstetrics, Semmelweis confronted the terrible reality of childbed fever, which killed prodigious numbers of women throughout Europe and /5(17).

Book Overview In Genius Belabored: Childbed Fever and the Tragic Life of Ignaz Semmelweis, Theodore G. Obenchain traces the life story of a nineteenth-century Hungarian obstetrician who was shunned and marginalized by the medical establishment for advancing a far-sighted but unorthodox solution to the appalling mortality rates that plagued new.

In Genius Belabored: Childbed Fever and the Tragic Life of Ignaz Semmelweis, Theodore G. Obenchain traces the life story of a nineteenth-century Hungarian obstetrician who was shunned and marginalized by the medical establishment for advancing a far-sighted but unorthodox solution to the appalling mortality rates that plagued new mothers of the by: 2.

Puerperal fever, also called childbed fever, infection of some part of the female reproductive organs following childbirth or of fever of °F (38 °C) and higher during the first 10 days following delivery or miscarriage are notifiable to the civil authority in most developed countries, and the notifying physician clarifies the diagnosis later, if possible.

In a Hungarian obstetrician named Ignaz Semmelweis, reflecting on his years as resident in the Vienna maternity clinic, wrote a graphic account of his attempt to diagnose and eliminate the then epidemic scourge of childbed fever.

The resulting Etiology triggered an immediate and international squall of protest from Semmelweis’s colleagues; today it is recognized as a pioneering classic 5/5(1). When he finally did write a book, The Etiology, the Concept, and the Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever, it was difficult to read and failed to impress many obstetrical his health failing and his behavior increasingly erratic and inappropriate, Semmelweis was committed to a.

Puerperal, or childbed, fever was a mystery, but both doctors and hospitals made it worse. Wherever the medical men went the disease grew more common, and in their hospitals it was commonest of : Druin Burch. childbed fever: [ pu-er´per-al ] pertaining to a puerpera or to the puerperium. puerperal fever an infectious, sometimes fatal, disease of childbirth; until the midth century, this dreaded, then-mysterious illness could sweep through a hospital maternity ward and kill most of the new mothers.

Today strict aseptic hospital techniques have. It is known as childbed or puerperal (from the Latin words for child and parent) fever. Nuland's book, a result of years of study on this topic, is certain to stir up a storm in the normally.

In the early and mid-nineteenth century, childbed fever was ubiquitous and very often fatal in Europe and his fascinating new book, "The Doctors' Plague," Sherwin P.

Nuland traces the history of this tragic disease and he sheds some light on how and why the medical profession was helpless to prevent it for so many years.5/5(5).

Childbed fever: Fever due to an infection after childbirth, usually of the placental site within the the infection involves the bloodstream, it constitutes puerperal ed fever was once a common cause of death for women of childbearing age, but it is now comparatively rare in the developed world due to improved sanitary practices in midwifery and obstetrics.

Childbed Fever: 18th-Century Cures Diane Morris | Thursday, July 7th, | Childbirth, Medicine | No Comments My previous post on childbed fever described the widespread belief that childbed fever — what today we call puerperal infections — was mainly caused by breathing foul, noxious air that arrived on the wind, permeated hospital furniture and people’s clothing, or emanated from a.

Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth throughout Europe up to the Second World War. Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and resulted in miserable and agonizing deaths for Price: $ Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to the Second World War, throughout Britain and Europe.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonizing deaths every year.

With deaths from childbed fever exploding, Semmelweis discovered that doctors themselves were spreading the disease. While his simple reforms worked immediately—childbed fever in Vienna all but disappeared—they brought down upon Semmelweis the wrath of the establishment, and led to his tragic end.4/4(1).Higher born women, those with access to expensive doctors, suffered from childbed fever more frequently than those attended by midwives who saw fewer patients and not usually one after another.

In Dr. Alexander Gordon wrote, “It is a disagreeable declaration for me to mention, that I myself was the means of carrying the infection to a.Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to the Second World War throughout Britain and Europe.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonising deaths every year.

This book provides an account of this tragic disease from its recognition in the 18th century up to.